Author Topic: Standard Template & General Use  (Read 397 times)

Isbister.J

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Standard Template & General Use
« on: February 05, 2017, 09:36:11 pm »
What is everyone basing their offices BEP off of? Currently we are using a modified/stripped down version of the Penn State BEP.  Also how religiously do you use it? Do you restrict it to large projects, to solely social BIM projects or do you manage one for every project regardless of size or complexity?

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mariepl

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2017, 08:19:03 pm »
IMHO, I think there is no way to "religiously" use the same BEP for all projects.  The requirements, modelling techniques, level of details and so on, will vary depending on project size, type and contract.
Nonetheless, even for smaller scale projects, I think one should still get an "even-more-stripped-down" version of the BEP in place for the project.

kirk.stalkie

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2017, 09:58:17 am »
I agree with mariepl, it's not practical to enforce the same template on all projects. What is important is having a framework that incorporates everything you COULD need, and then edit it to suit your project. Having a robust framework improves consistency between projects, because specific items are taken out, instead of being added in as needed (from who knows where). It also helps educate those involved in the BEP process about what BIM can do and how your firm leverages BIM.

In regards to what we're basing ours off of, we referenced PENN State, and the CanBIM Protocol v2.

Meg_B

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2017, 03:29:13 pm »
I'd be interested to see what would be suggested if we had more varied but common place model uses to test Execution Planning on... I agree that templates are important, as well as frameworks, but I've seen many good European BIM execution plans that are reverse engineered based on the desired outcome by the project team rather than just an individual firm/discipline. Some of these went so far as to define the Protocol for multiple software suites, as well as multiple exchange mappings. Just have to do your research to find the gems abroad!

kirk.stalkie

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2017, 03:42:22 pm »
You make an excellent point Meg. It's important to keep a focus on what you want to achieve using BIM and what you expect your end-state to be. If you know what you're tying to accomplish, you can map out the tools and workflows you need. If you find a new one, add it to your framework for future reference.

elogictech

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2017, 05:49:40 am »
Hello, I dont know if this is the right place for this queries. However I needed some help putting together an effective BEP. Can anyone advise as to what items constitute a successful BIM Execution Plan?

skeenliside

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2017, 08:52:31 am »
A good place to start is the guide and templates published by Penn State, and now incorporated into the US National BIM Standard.

http://bim.psu.edu/project/resources/

https://www.nationalbimstandard.org/
Susan Keenliside
S8 Inc.
Chair, bSC Members Community
Delegate, buildingSMART International
Delegate, ISO TC59 SC13

Nicholas.Dabideen

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2017, 11:17:03 am »
In my humble opinion, the Penn State/AIA e202/CanBIM BEP's are all kinda the same if you look at them from a 10,000ft. view.

I have developed a simplified version which is about 4-5 pages, sticking only to the essentials and is good for 99% of all projects (yes I have a BEP for every project, and they are kept very simple, focusing on only high level stuff)

The intent is to scale this up based on the level of complexity/project specific requirements(kind of like applying the concept of 'LOD' to the BEP - where in this case the 'LOD' is directly proportional to the project scope).

Focusing on the end game/deliverables first is a great place to start as some others have mentioned, this really helps to keep things on track as I'm sure we all know how easy it is to get caught up in the minutia of BIM, especially on large complex projects - keeping things simple and maintaining focus on the big picture is a key to success, and the BEP can help do this for all stakeholders.

My next steps are to develop a similar, scaled and simplified version of the MPS, who knows I may even share with the group here when it's all done!

Hope this helps :)

Thanks

ND.

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elogictech

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2017, 12:14:03 pm »
A good place to start is the guide and templates published by Penn State, and now incorporated into the US National BIM Standard.

http://bim.psu.edu/project/resources/

https://www.nationalbimstandard.org/

Thank you for the quick revert.

Regards
Syed Farhan
eLogicTech Solutions

elogictech

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Re: Standard Template & General Use
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2017, 12:18:14 pm »
In my humble opinion, the Penn State/AIA e202/CanBIM BEP's are all kinda the same if you look at them from a 10,000ft. view.

I have developed a simplified version which is about 4-5 pages, sticking only to the essentials and is good for 99% of all projects (yes I have a BEP for every project, and they are kept very simple, focusing on only high level stuff)

The intent is to scale this up based on the level of complexity/project specific requirements(kind of like applying the concept of 'LOD' to the BEP - where in this case the 'LOD' is directly proportional to the project scope).

Focusing on the end game/deliverables first is a great place to start as some others have mentioned, this really helps to keep things on track as I'm sure we all know how easy it is to get caught up in the minutia of BIM, especially on large complex projects - keeping things simple and maintaining focus on the big picture is a key to success, and the BEP can help do this for all stakeholders.

My next steps are to develop a similar, scaled and simplified version of the MPS, who knows I may even share with the group here when it's all done!

Hope this helps :)

Thanks

ND.

Hi ND,

I totally agree with you on that. Several occasions we might be able to satisfy the requirement of having a BEP by formalizing the plan in the form of detailed sketch. Having said that would you be able to share an overview of topics you have in your simplified version of the BEP.

Best Regards
SF
eLogicTech Solutions
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 12:23:09 pm by elogictech »